AP/Honors Programs

Our Successful Advanced Placement Curriculum

Archmere offers A.P. course work in 19 areas and is proud of its 20-year history with the College Board A.P. Program. For over two decades our students have excelled both regionally and nationally, consistently meriting the College Board's highest A.P. Scholar awards and thus college credits toward their future undergraduate studies. Archmere's dedicated and passionate A.P. teachers implement a college-paced curriculum with a demanding, strenuous work load.
Our A.P. curriculum and success is a clear indication of the rigors of an Archmere education. Colleges and universities often rely on a strong A.P. Program to help distinguish the strength of a school's curriculum and a student's course of study at the national level. Annually, approximately 170 Archmere students take over 300 A.P. Exams.
  • Honors Algebra I

    A year long course for freshmen who have already been exposed to algebra. The course covers the same topics as Algebra 1, and adds a discussion of polynomials, matrices and probability. Students will be required to think critically and apply their skills in new and varied situations.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Meeting placement exam requirements.
  • Honors Biology

    Honors Biology is a two-semester course designed for freshmen. The course is designed to survey all major topics in the study of living things including biochemistry, genetics, cell structure and function, evolution, animal and plant physiology, and ecology. In addition to the lecture component, the course includes weekly laboratory exercises meant to strengthen the students' understanding of the concepts presented in class that week. The course is intended to be a challenging, college-preparatory level course.

    Prerequisites: Placement is based upon teacher recommendation and placement test for freshmen.

    Initial entrance into Honors science begins with success on the placement test in May before the freshman year. After that first year, Honors placement for the following year is determined by the student’s performance in the current year. A College Prep-level student who does very well can advance to the Honors level in the next year. Similarly, a student may move from Honors to College Prep if student performance dictates.
  • Honors Literary Genres and Composition

    Freshman English Honors is a two-semester course that stresses the use of the English language through composition and discussion. The course introduces students to various literary genres, with an emphasis on world literature. The course also includes vocabulary development, grammar, and related language skills.

    Covering the same material as the College Prep course, the Honors course has additional reading assignments, more demanding standards for writing assignments, and works at an accelerated pace. Honors students are expected to possess advanced skills in writing, reading comprehension and grammar and also be eager and proactive to improve those skills. Students should anticipate 45 minutes of homework each night.

    Pre-requisite: Department approval based on entrance exam and text scores.
  • AP United States History

    AP US History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college course in a high school setting. It is a yearlong survey of American history from the age of exploration to the present. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. Considerable time in class spent on critical thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and historiography. Students will be assessed through daily discussion, essay writing, presentations, quizzes, exams, and the research paper.

    PRE-REQUISITES:
    1. Must have a recommendation from current History teacher
    2. Must have successfully completed World History
    3. Must have earned a B+ or higher in S2 World History

    In order to take an AP history course, a student must demonstrate a consistent work ethic, an understanding of historical complexities, well-developed writing skills, and a willingness to be challenged. Based on both the student’s demonstration of these skills and their concurrent success in history course of that school year, a student may receive the necessary teacher recommendation to move into the AP level. 
  • Honors American Literature and Composition

    Honors American Literature and Composition is a two-semester, sophomore course which presents an intensified study of the principles of writing including vocabulary, grammar, usage and organization. The course includes a chronological survey of major works of American Literature, along with reading and analytical skills. Second semester includes a short research paper project done in conjunction with the history department. In addition to the work of the college prep course, the Honors classes analyzes more historical selections throughout the year, reads two additional novels, and generally moves at a swifter pace. Students should anticipate 45 minutes of homework each night.

    Pre-requisite: Department approval.

    Students eligible for Honors and AP classes must possess strong literacy skills. Cogent thinking, solid reading comprehension, and sound writing skills are needed for success. Advanced Placement candidates should also be self-driven and willing to work with their instructor as needed. Intellectual curiosity as well as a strong work ethic are essential. 

    Any student with the requisite skills and who is in strong academic standing in their current class may receive a teacher recommendation for placement in an honors or AP course. Students enrolled in these courses must maintain a B average. Teachers evaluate and approve students at the end of each academic year based on both skill development and overall performance.
  • Honors French III

    The third year modern language courses continue the study of grammar and vocabulary as a means of expanding communication skills. The range of listening comprehension activities is extended. Readings include primary text and cultural topics. Greater emphasis is placed on written communication and practical communicative skills. Less emphasis is put on explicit grammar instruction, as grammar is contextualized and integrated into spoken communication. All skills are strengthened through exposure to multi-media and technology. As a result the intermediate student is a more sophisticated and independent learner. Level III students deepen their appreciation of culture through individual and group research and presentations.

    The Honors courses provide additional opportunities for exploration of literature and culture.

    PRE-REQUISITE for Honors Courses: Department Approval and an A in Intermediate French average prior to enrollment.

    ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENT:
    In order to achieve eligibility for Honors and AP Spanish or French and for Honors Chinese III and IV, a student must demonstrate a consistent commitment to maintaining the target language, with little to no prompting, in the previous Honors levels. Students who cannot maintain communication in the target language during class will not be considered for the Honors or AP levels, regardless of their earned grades. Additionally, the student must maintain a consistently strong work ethic both inside and outside class, completing all assigned work in a timely manner and to the best of his/her ability. Students in Honors courses must maintain a B average to remain in the course. Students must maintain a B+ to remain in the Level IV course. Credit will be awarded upon successful completion of both semesters.
  • Honors Geometry

    A one year course which mirrors the topics in Geometry but with a wider scope and variety. Coordinate Geometry is emphasized throughout the year so that the students’ algebraic skills are maintained. More emphasis is placed on proofs but students are encouraged to use their natural sense as opposed to a more formalized, axiomatic approach.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Honors Algebra 1 or meeting placement exam requirements

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • AP Computer Science A

    AP Computer Science A is equivalent to a first-semester, college- level course in computer science.The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing.The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language.

    These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems.The AP Computer Science A course curriculum is compatible with many CS1 courses in colleges and universities.

    For covering these subjects, students will use the Eclipse and Dr. Java IDEs. Students should expect to perform work outside regular class periods.

    Prerequisites: students must earn a minimum of a B+ in Introduction to Computer Programming and must have earned a B+ in most recent math course.  Also, the student in AP Comp Sci A must be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II/Trig or higher.

    Note: Students may enroll simultaneously in AP Computer Science Principles and AP Computer Science A.
  • AP European History

    This college-level honors course studies the basic principles of modern Western Civilization. It focuses on the unique cultural, political, economic, and social development of Europe and its global impact form 1450 to the present. Students learn and practice the critical thinking and writing skills necessary for college work, as well as prepare to take the College Board A.P. test in May. Success on this test may earn the student college credit.

    PRE-REQUISITES:
    1. Must have a recommendation from current History teacher
    2. Must have successfully completed US History
    3. Must have earned an A in S2 CP US History
    4. Must have earned a B or higher in  S2 APUSH
    5. Must have successfully completed the summer work

    In order to take an AP history course, a student must demonstrate a consistent work ethic, an understanding of historical complexities, well-developed writing skills, and a willingness to be challenged. Based on both the student’s demonstration of these skills and their concurrent success in history course of that school year, a student may receive the necessary teacher recommendation to move into the AP level. 
  • Honors Chemistry

    This is a general chemistry course that stresses theory, problem-solving, and the reinforcement of topics via laboratory experiments. First semester topics include scientific measurement, atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermochemistry, and states of matter. Kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry are studied in detail in the second semester. The class meets eight periods per cycle to allow time for laboratory experiments. Computers are used in many labs for data collection analysis.

    Prerequisites: Minimum of C+ in Honors Biology and department approval.

    Initial entrance into Honors science begins with success on the placement test in May before the freshman year. After that first year, Honors placement for the following year is determined by the student’s performance in the current year. A College Prep-level student who does very well can advance to the Honors level in the next year. Similarly, a student may move from Honors to College Prep if student performance dictates.
  • Honors French IV

    Level IV further advances and refines grammar and communicative skills. Acquired knowledge is applied in classroom discussion, presentations, compositions, and readings (cultural, literary, and contemporary). Level IV students are expected to initiate and maintain communication with minimal prompting. They use the target language creatively, applying acquired knowledge and expanding their limits through study of advanced grammar and vocabulary. This course provides students with hands on experience in cultural topics enhanced by multi-media and technology.

    PRE-REQUISITE:
    Department Approval and an A average in French III or a B+ in Honors French III prior to enrollment.

    ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENT:
    In order to achieve eligibility for Honors and AP Spanish or French and for Honors Chinese III and IV, a student must demonstrate a consistent commitment to maintaining the target language, with little to no prompting, in the previous Honors levels. Students who cannot maintain communication in the target language during class will not be considered for the Honors or AP levels, regardless of their earned grades. Additionally, the student must maintain a consistently strong work ethic both inside and outside class, completing all assigned work in a timely manner and to the best of his/her ability. Students in Honors courses must maintain a B average to remain in the course.Students must maintain a B+ to remain in the Level IV course. Credit will be awarded upon successful completion of both semesters.
  • AP French

    AP French Language and Culture is a college-level course intended for students with a strong foundation in the target language. The course will be taught exclusively in the target language, in order for students to build upon and hone their proficiency in French speaking, writing, listening and reading. Emphasis will be placed on real world application of the target language, and language as it relates to culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Students will develop their ability to argue and defend a point of view, specifically through their interaction with authentic sources. Themes will include (but are not limited to) contemporary life, global challenges, aesthetics and science/technology, with an interdisciplinary philosophy at the forefront. Students enrolled in the course must have a strong command of the language, and will be able to draw upon previously learned grammatical concepts and vocabulary to expand their use of the target language.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Department Approval and an A average in S2 Honors French IV prior to enrollment.
    ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENT: Students must maintain a B average to remain in the A.P. course.
    In order to achieve eligibility for AP Spanish or French, a student must demonstrate a consistent commitment to maintaining the target language, with little to no prompting, in the previous levels. Students who cannot maintain communication in the target language during class will not be considered for the AP level, regardless of their earned grades. Additionally, the student must maintain a consistently strong work ethic both inside and outside class, completing all assigned work in a timely manner and to the best of his/her ability.
  • AP World History

    The course seeks to develop a greater understanding of global processes and interactions between human societies. The course reviews world history from its foundations to the present with a particular focus on the last one thousand years. Students develop skills in organizing and presenting information, analyzing primary sources, comparing cultures, and writing essays. Assessment of student performance is based on tests, quizzes, essays, presentations as well as classroom participation. The course is intended to prepare students to take the A.P. World History test.

    PRE-REQUISITES:
    1. Must have a recommendation from current History teacher
    2. Must have successfully completed European History
      1. Must have earned an A in S2 CP European History
      2. Must have earned a B or higher in S2 AP Euro
    3. Must have successfully completed the summer work
    In order to take an AP history course, a student must demonstrate a consistent work ethic, an understanding of historical complexities, well-developed writing skills, and a willingness to be challenged. Based on both the student’s demonstration of these skills and their concurrent success in history course of that school year, a student may receive the necessary teacher recommendation to move into the AP level. 
  • Honors Algebra II & Trigonometry

    This one year course will cover the properties of the polynomial and rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, and the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions that will be needed for the study of calculus. As time allows, the course will also cover the conic sections, parametric and polar graphs, and the elements of probability and enumeration.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Honors Geometry and Department Approval

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • AP Government and Politics

    AP United States Government & Politics provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality. Considerable time in class spent on critical thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and historiography. Students will be assessed through daily discussion, essay writing, presentations, quizzes, and exams.

    PRE-REQUISITES:
    1. Must be a rising senior.
    2. Must have a recommendation from your current History teacher
    3. Must have successfully completed US History
      1. Must have earned a B+ or higher in S2 CP US History
      2. Must have earned a B or higher in S2 APUSH
    In order to take an AP history course, a student must demonstrate a consistent work ethic, an understanding of historical complexities, well-developed writing skills, and a willingness to be challenged. Based on both the student’s demonstration of these skills and their concurrent success in history course of that school year, a student may receive the necessary teacher recommendation to move into the AP level. 
  • Honors Math Analysis

    A full year course for those juniors who have completed Algebra II and Trigonometry and may wish to take A.P. Calculus as seniors. The course covers polynomial, rational and transcendental functions. Also included are topics of parametric equations, polar equations and probability.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Algebra II and Trigonometry
  • Honors Physics

    This course is a rigorous introduction to physics without the use of calculus. Understanding of algebra and trigonometry is assumed. Students should be able to solve math problems with one equation and one unknown, and two equations and two unknowns. The topics in this course include Mechanics, Waves, Electricity, and Magnetism (time permitting). The course is designed to be equivalent to a university course in physics for a non-science major. Laboratory work is about 30% of the course time and about 30% of the grade.

    Prerequisites: Minimum of C+ in Honors Chemistry and department approval.

    Initial entrance into Honors science begins with success on the placement test in May before the freshman year. After that first year, Honors placement for the following year is determined by the student’s performance in the current year. A College Prep-level student who does very well can advance to the Honors level in the next year. Similarly, a student may move from Honors to College Prep if student performance dictates.
  • AP Biology

    The AP Biology is a rigorous two semester biology course equivalent to the two semesters of biology for biology majors at a university or college. The course covers a breadth of topics ranging across all realms of biology. The core curriculum of the course centers on the Campbell Biology text and the mandates for the course from the College Board. It does include an extensive laboratory program and requires scientific writing and research. All content is finished by the middle of April so that review time is allotted for the AP exam. All students are required to take the College Board AP exam in biology in May.

    Prerequisites: B+ in previous Honors science courses.

    For AP courses, students need to earn a B+ or better in the current Honors course or a B or better in the current AP course to move to or continue in the AP level the following year. Students can move from AP Biology to AP Chemistry without taking honors chemistry if they do well in AP Biology.  Students may move into AP Physics from AP Chemistry without honors physics if they do very well in AP Chemistry. To take AP Physics, students must have completed at least one year of AP Calculus AB or be enrolled in  AP Calculus BC concurrently.
  • AP Chemistry

    The primary objective of this course is to present a General Chemistry course with laboratory that prepares all students for the Advanced Placement Examination in May.

    The laboratory experiments are a mix of both traditional general chemistry experiments and computer assisted labs. This is a lecture-based class. Our school follows an eight-day rotating schedule with one "drop day" per cycle. We meet for four forty-seven minute periods and three ninety-four minute double periods per cycle. The double-period sessions are used for laboratory and quizzes.

    Laboratory experiments are scheduled to coincide with the lecture material. Proper technique and data collection are stressed the laboratory program. Students work in pairs. They maintain an electronic notebook using Aquaminds Noteshare software. Each lab station has an Macbook and the full suite of Vernier probeware. We have experimented with the Virtual Chemistry Lab provided with the textbook. Specifically we have completed the Atomic Spectra and Bomb Calorimetry experiments. Each laboratory report consists of a pre-lab, data tables, calculated results, sources of error, and conclusions. On a quarterly basis, the lab notebooks are submitted for grading via email. The laboratory notebook grade is 20% of the semester grade.

    Tests are scheduled after the completion of each topic. Generally these test follow a mini AP format of multiple choice, reaction completion, short answer questions, and problems. Students are required to answer questions succinctly and their problem solving must be organized and logical. Writing net ionic equations is practiced throughout the year. The first semester ends with a final examination, which is prepared from previous examinations.

    Prerequisites: B+ in Honors or B in AP science courses.

    For AP courses, students need to earn a B+ or better in the current Honors course or a B or better in the current AP course to move to or continue in the AP level the following year. Students can move from AP Biology to AP Chemistry without taking honors chemistry if they do well in AP Biology.  Students may move into AP Physics from AP Chemistry without honors physics if they do very well in AP Chemistry. To take AP Physics, students must have completed at least one year of AP Calculus AB or be enrolled in  AP Calculus BC concurrently.
  • Honors Calculus

    An intermediate level, introductory, Calculus course including differentiation and integration, with applications to business and science, for those students who do not require an extensive Precalculus review.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Algebra II and Trigonometry with a minimum grade of B, Honors Math Analysis, Honors Algebra II & Trig or Department approval.

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • AP Calculus AB

    A one year college level course in differentiation and integration, including techniques and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. (The Advanced Placement exam is required.) Students should anticipate one hour of homework per night.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Honors Algebra II & Trig or Honors Math Analysis, and Department Approval

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • AP Physics C

    AP Physics is a calculus-based physics course covering mechanics, electricity, and magnetism in rigor and depth. The course follows the College Board recommendations for AP Physics and is intended to be the equivalent of two semesters of university-level Physics. The course has three double periods per cycle. The fall semester covers Mechanics, and requires familiarity with basic integration and differentiation, algebraic problem-solving, and trigonometry. The spring semester covers Electricity and Magnetism, with a higher level of abstraction and a heavier reliance on calculus ideas and techniques. Inquiry, critical thinking, lab explorations, and clear explanations in oral and written work will be emphasized.

    Prerequisites: Students must have earned a B+ in Semester 2 of either AP Chem or Honors Physics; and a B+ in Semester 2 AP Calc AB.

    For AP courses, students need to earn a B+ or better in the current Honors course or a B or better in the current AP course to move to or continue in the AP level the following year. Students can move from AP Biology to AP Chemistry without taking honors chemistry if they do well in AP Biology.  Students may move into AP Physics from AP Chemistry without honors physics if they do very well in AP Chemistry. To take AP Physics, students must have completed at least one year of AP Calculus AB or be enrolled in  AP Calculus BC concurrently.
  • Honors Spanish III

    The third year modern language courses continue the study of grammar and vocabulary as a means of expanding communication skills. The range of listening comprehension activities is extended. Readings include primary text and cultural topics. Greater emphasis is placed on written communication and practical communicative skills.  Less emphasis is put on explicit grammar instruction, as grammar is contextualized and integrated into spoken communication. All skills are strengthened through exposure to multi-media and technology. As a result the intermediate student is a more sophisticated and independent learner. Level III students deepen their appreciation of culture through individual and group research and presentations.

    The Honors courses provide additional opportunities for exploration of literature and culture. 
     
    PRE-REQUISITE for Honors Courses: Department Approval and an A average in Intermediate Spanish prior to enrollment.

    ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENT:
    In order to achieve eligibility for Honors and AP Spanish or French and for Honors Chinese III and IV, a student must demonstrate a consistent commitment to maintaining the target language, with little to no prompting, in the previous Honors levels. Students who cannot maintain communication in the target language during class will not be considered for the Honors or AP levels, regardless of their earned grades. Additionally, the student must maintain a consistently strong work ethic both inside and outside class, completing all assigned work in a timely manner and to the best of his/her ability. Students in Honors courses must maintain a B average to remain in the course. Students in Honors courses must maintain a B average to remain in the course.
  • AP Calculus BC

    A one year course taken by those students who wish to take the BC level of the Advanced Placement Mathematics Exam. The content includes those topics of the BC syllabus not covered in A.P. Calculus AB. included are integration techniques, infinite series, conics, parametric and polar coordinates.

    PRE-REQUISITE: A.P. Calculus AB and Department Approval

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • AP Environmental Science

    AP Environmental Science is a one year course that is intended to prepare student for good performance on the AP exam as well as awareness of the issues involved in living sustainably in the natural world. Through lecture, outdoor experiments, student presentations, and an overnight field trip, students experience their environment by means of several modalities. Topics considered are aquatic and terrestrial ecology, renewable energy, toxicology, waste disposal, air and water pollution, and sustainable cities. Resources used in the lab and the field include: Vernier probes, the Internet, LaMotte chemical tests, and several software programs.

    Prerequisites: Honors or AP science courses.
  • AP 2D Design

    This portfolio is designated for work that focuses on the use of two-dimensional (2-D) elements and principles of art and design, including point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time, unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, and hierarchy. Students should consider how materials, processes, and ideas can be used to make work that exists on a flat surface. Students can work with any materials, processes, and ideas. Graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking are among the possibilities for submission. Still images from videos or films are accepted. Composite images may be submitted.

  • AP Statistics

    A college level non-calculus based course emphasizing four main areas: exploring/organizing data, planning a study or experiment, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. As outlined in the AP syllabus, the focus is on modern data analysis rather than theory. Many applications from the behavior sciences will be studied. Students are expected to use the graphing calculator on the AP exam, thus this technology will be used extensively. Statistical software will also be used since students will need to interpret standard computer printouts. This course is good preparation for students interested in majoring in science, math or engineering.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Algebra II & Trigonometry and Department approval.

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • Honors Spanish IV

    Level IV further advances and refines grammar and communicative skills as well as exploration of cultures through literature, music, and film. Acquired knowledge is applied in classroom discussion, presentations, compositions, and readings. Level IV students are expected to initiate and maintain communication in the target language with minimal prompting. They use the target language creatively, applying acquired knowledge and expanding their limits through study of advanced grammar and vocabulary. Less emphasis is put on explicit grammar instruction, as grammar is contextualized and integrated into spoken communication. This course provides students with hands-on experience in cultural topics enhanced by multimedia and technology. 

    The honors courses provide additional opportunities for exploration of literature and culture.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Department Approval and an A average in Spanish III or a B+ in Honors Spanish III prior to enrollment.

    ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENT:
    In order to achieve eligibility for Honors and AP Spanish or French and for Honors Chinese III and IV, a student must demonstrate a consistent commitment to maintaining the target language, with little to no prompting, in the previous Honors levels. Students who cannot maintain communication in the target language during class will not be considered for the Honors or AP levels, regardless of their earned grades. Additionally, the student must maintain a consistently strong work ethic both inside and outside class, completing all assigned work in a timely manner and to the best of his/her ability. Students in Honors courses must maintain a B average to remain in the course. Students in Honors courses must maintain a B average to remain in the course.
  • AP 3D Design

    This portfolio is designated for work that focuses on the use of three-dimensional (3-D) elements and principles of art and design, including point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, volume, mass, occupied/unoccupied space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time, unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, connection, juxtaposition, and hierarchy. Students should consider how materials, processes, and ideas can be used to make work that involves space and form. Students can work with any materials, processes, and ideas. Figurative or non figurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, glasswork, installation, performance, assemblage, and 3-D fabric/fiber arts are among the possibilities for submission. Still images from videos or films are accepted. Composite images may be submitted.


  • AP Spanish

    AP Spanish Language and Culture is a college-level course intended for students with a strong foundation in the target language. The course will be taught exclusively in the target language, in order for students to build upon and hone their proficiency in Spanish speaking, writing, listening and reading. Emphasis will be placed on real world application of the target language, and language as it relates to culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Students will develop their ability to argue and defend a point of view, specifically through their interaction with authentic sources. Themes will include (but are not limited to) contemporary life, global challenges, aesthetics and science/technology, with an interdisciplinary philosophy at the forefront. Students enrolled in the course must have a strong command of the language, and will be able to draw upon previously learned grammatical concepts and vocabulary to expand their use of the target language.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Department Approval and an A average in S2 Spanish IV or Honors Spanish IV prior to enrollment.
    ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: Students must maintain a B average to remain in the A.P. course. In order to achieve eligibility for AP Spanish or French, a student must demonstrate a consistent commitment to maintaining the target language, with little to no prompting, in previous course levels. Students who cannot maintain communication in the target language during class will not be considered for the AP level, regardless of their earned grades. Additionally, the student must maintain a consistently strong work ethic both inside and outside class, completing all assigned work in a timely manner and to the best of his/her ability.
  • Honors Linear Algebra

    Honors Linear Algebra is the equivalent of a college level Linear Algebra course.  Linear Algebra consists of the study of systems of linear equations and linear transformations using matrices and vector spaces.  This course will also introduce students to other high level branches of math such as game theory and graph theory.  This course is designed for advanced math students with a high interest in math and problem solving.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Both the completion of AP Calculus AB and department approval. (This course may be taken concurrently with AP Calculus BC.)

    Students in Honors/AP math classes must have a solid foundation of mathematical concepts (evident from placement tests and/or from grades in previous courses) and must show a willingness to challenge themselves. Students must demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to work independently, using concepts taught in class on homework and test problems that might not exactly match ones done in class. Freshmen or transfers are placed in Honors based on placement tests.  Current Honors students need a grade of B+ or above AND approval from their current Math teacher.  Students wishing to move up from College Prep to Honors must have an A in the current course, and need teacher and department chair approval, often accompanied by completion of a review packet. 
  • AP Drawing

    This portfolio is designated for work that focuses on the use of mark-making, line, surface, space, light and shade, and composition. Students should consider marks that can be used to make drawings, the arrangement of marks, the materials and processes used to make marks, and relationships of marks and ideas. Students can work with any materials, processes, and ideas. Drawing (analog and digital), painting, printmaking, and mixed media work are among the possibilities for submission. Still images from videos or films are accepted. Composite images may be submitted.

  • AP English Language and British Literature

    AP English Language and British Literature surveys British literature and introduces advanced writing skills; in doing so, it also prepares students for the AP English Language exam. The AP Language exam tests students on rhetoric and argument; according the College Board course description, "the purpose of the AP English Language and Composition course is to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers." The course prioritizes critical thinking, close reading and careful writing.

    Pre-Requisite: Department Approval

    Students eligible for Honors and AP classes must possess strong literacy skills. Cogent thinking, solid reading comprehension, and sound writing skills are needed for success. Advanced Placement candidates should also be self-driven and willing to work with their instructor as needed. Intellectual curiosity as well as a strong work ethic are essential. 

    Any student with the requisite skills and who is in strong academic standing in their current class may receive a teacher recommendation for placement in an honors or AP course. Students enrolled in these courses must maintain a B average. Teachers evaluate and approve students at the end of each academic year based on both skill development and overall performance.
  • AP English Literature

    A two-semester college level course designed to prepare students for A.P. Literature and Composition exam and to emphasize rigorous analysis of poetry, prose, and drama. The course will broaden and deepen the students' knowledge of literature and their critical and analytical thinking and writing skills. Second semester will include more poetry and drama than first and will emphasize specific test-taking techniques. Both semesters will require a demanding variety of critical compositions, independent study, and intensive reading.

    All spring senior elective courses will include a literature-based research paper. Students taking more than one elective will complete a short research project in one of the electives and the full project in the other. If you want to take two English courses, fill in one of them as an elective (rather than as a second choice) on your course selection sheet. Students must take at least one elective each semester.

    PRE-REQUISITE: Senior Standing, Department Approval

    Students eligible for Honors and AP classes must possess strong literacy skills. Cogent thinking, solid reading comprehension, and sound writing skills are needed for success. Advanced Placement candidates should also be self-driven and willing to work with their instructor as needed. Intellectual curiosity as well as a strong work ethic are essential. 

    Any student with the requisite skills and who is in strong academic standing in their current class may receive a teacher recommendation for placement in an honors or AP course. Students enrolled in these courses must maintain a B average. Teachers evaluate and approve students at the end of each academic year based on both skill development and overall performance.
  • Description of AP Portfolio Courses

    The AP Art and Design course framework presents an inquiry-based approach to learning about and making art and design. The course focuses on concepts and skills emphasized within college art and design foundations courses with the same intent: to help students become inquisitive, thoughtful artists and designers able to articulate information about their work. AP Art and Design students develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection. As in introductory college courses, students in AP Studio Art courses will need to work inside and outside the classroom and beyond scheduled periods. Maintaining a sketchbook or a visual journal will be a course expectation, and will support the depth of learning expected of AP students. Constructive, formative critiques—essential in college classes—are equally important in AP Art and Design. By observing, discussing, and analyzing works of art and design, students learn to evaluate their own and others’ work based on relationships of materials, processes, and ideas. Students’ individual and collaborative evaluations of work—both in progress and completed— develops their understanding of how components of a work interact to produce an overall effect. The course provides formal and informal opportunities for students to develop an understanding of context, interpretation, and how their work relates to art and design traditions. Possibilities for thinking and making are expanded by frequent interactions with diverse works of art and design through research, museum visits, and critiques. The AP Studio Art Exam structure consists of two sections: Five Selected Works (40% of score) and 15 Sustained Investigation Works (60% of score).
     
    Though there is significant potential overlap in the primary areas of focus for each of the three AP Studio Art courses offered, the skills emphasized in each course is distinctive. Click on AP course titles for course descriptions.

    Successful AP Portfolio submissions will demonstrate:
    § Visual evidence of advanced 2-D, 3-D, or drawing skills
    § Visual evidence of synthesis of materials, processes, and ideas
    § Visual evidence of the written idea in all five works of art
     
    A comprehensive Course & Exam Description can be found at this link.

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Archmere Academy is a private, Catholic, college preparatory co-educational academy,
grades 9-12 founded in 1932 by the Norbertine Fathers.